Look closely. Yes, a hammerkop is standing atop another hammerkop in ritualistic behavior witnessed in Kruger National Park. Photo is a screen grab from the video

Look closely. Yes, a hammerkop is standing atop another hammerkop in ritualistic behavior witnessed in Kruger National Park. Photo is a screen grab from the video

David Krug, a Swede who lives in Kruger National Park in South Africa, enjoys the surprises nature delivers on occasion, such as the one he saw the other day when a hammerkop jumped atop another hammerkop, appearing as if it were surfing.

"It also reminds me of cheerleaders cheering and standing on each other," Krug told GrindTV in an email. "Hilarious…

"I am generally not very interested in birds, but I am interested in any funny animal individuals and any funny animal look."

Indeed, the ritual is as humorous as it is odd:

"Maybe it's a love dance," Krug surmised.

That might be the most logical explanation, but according to Wikipedia, and other online sources, hammerkop birds—also referred to as a hamerkop, hammerkopf, and hammerhead stork—are known for their odd ritualistic behaviors, such as running circles around each other as they call loudly, raise their crests and flutter their wings.

Another is called "false mounting," in which one bird stands on top of another but not necessarily for mating. And the birds might be the same sex.

"I have met two other people who have spent many months inside [Kruger] park and they have seen or heard of this as well, but they don't know what it means exactly," Krug said. "I guess some ornithologists may know.

"The day I find out I will be happy to know, but for now I am happy to see it as just one more of the funny, unexpected and slightly mysterious interactions that animals in nature has sometimes."

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