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So, you major in creative financing, minor in time management, and have the curiosity of a small child? Welcome to my world. My ambition is hindered by a behavior that I try to hide from friends and coworkers, but here it is: I have the attention span of a gnat. I am curious by nature, and in theory, I love to learn new things. However, too often I plow head-first into a new project with verve, then promptly lose interest. These actions create a perfect storm of my least favorite things: wasted money, regret, and an “I told you so,” from those who know me best—it’s a dismal consequence to an inspired beginning. If you can relate, follow my lead. Head over to Dabble, a new website that caters to our limitations—time and money—while indulging our short attention spans.

Photo courtesy of Dabble

Photo courtesy of Dabble

Commitment-phobes, lend me your ear—I’m about to school you, literally. Catering to the curious set, Dabble makes it easy to try something new in a one-time, 2-hour, budget-friendly class. You’ve always wanted to learn how to knit, play guitar, and start an urban garden, but you’ve recently discovered beekeeping, kombucha 101, and cooking with ayurvedic spices. Wherever your interests take you, finding a class is simple: browse through the city guide and peruse to your heart’s content (the site is updated frequently). Don’t see a class you want to take? Suggest one. Dabble is very accommodating. When you’re ready to commit, buy the class online (average cost is $30). Finally, go to class and “dabble” to your heart’s content, no strings attached. Now whether you decide to stick with your newly acquired skill is your business—I would never judge.