Text: Marty Wendt
Photos: Keith Mulligan
Test Rider: Scott Yoquelet

Sign Here Please
Schwinn has upped the ante with signature bikes for 1999 and given their chick-magnet AA Pro, Matt Pohlkamp, his own bike. Matt joins teammates Brian Foster and Joey Garcia on Schwinn’s list of pros with autograph-series bikes. This one is a 6061-T6 aluminum race machine that Matt has been spending some time kicking butt on. Now you can own one too.

The Problems
At the test site, Scott warmed up by hitting a rhythm section and noticed right away that the frame’s dropouts were too big. Scott’s ankles hit because the dropouts stuck out too far where they are welded to the chain stays. We also noticed within 15 minutes that the spindle on the XS three-piece cranks had already bent. Scott had been going big on the last set in the rhythm, and cased pretty hard a few times. Nevertheless, we were bummed that we bent the spindle that quickly. The third problem was also due to Scott’s hard landings. On one particular run, Scott misjudged a set of doubles and landed 50-50. This twisted the forks a little. These are some of the beefiest forks Schwinn has put on one of their race bikes, and we’d say that almost any fork would have bent in the same situation.

The Solutions
After talking to Schwinn, we were informed that the dropouts had already been redesigned. The bikes that are available at shops now already have the new design¿so you don’t have to worry about the dropout problem. The spindle problem was also addressed. Schwinn has redesigned that, too. Now all new spindles will be improved. The hollow section in the center will be reduced. The bolts that hold the crank arms to the spindle will be shorter, and the rest of the spindle will be solid. This should beef them up pretty well. As for the forks, Schwinn is looking them over to see exactly what happened, and what needs to be done for improvements.

Parts will always break, but it’s only a problem when companies ignore what is happening and hope that the problems will go away. When a company stands behind their products as well as Schwinn, it’s a great sign. They admit that there are problems, and they address them quickly with redesigned parts. It should always be like this.

Pro Talk on the Pro Stock
With that out of the way, lets get to all that was good about this bike¿there’s a lot. The frame held it’s own through some tough riding, and Scott was instantly comfortable on the bike. Here’s what he had to say, along with some of our thoughts.

Handling:
“It’s fairly long, and rides and jumps really well. It handles great in the air.” With a 37-3/4″ to 39-1/4″ wheelbase this bike will be most comfortable for riders over 5′ 6″ tall. As the photos show, it did fine in the air. Scott was able to throw it around easily, and was pointing the front-end down to catch back-sides in the rhythm section after his first run. Handling, overall, was great.

Frame:
“The bike is really solid.” 6061 aluminum construction makes this bike stiff to begin with. Features like a 1-1/2-inch diameter top tube, a 2-inch diameter down tube, a huge bottom bracket yoke, the Ram Air seat stay yoke, and massive chain stays only add to the stiffness, without making it uncomfortable to ride. While the seat stays appear small compared to the chain stays, they’re very stiff. Most seat stays flex outward when the brakes are applied, due to brake-induced forces, but Schwinn has done an exceptional job to cut down on that flex. This is partially due to Schwinn’s use of their Epicenter Seat stays, which bend the stays inward at the brake. The frame also has gussets where the top- and down tubes meet the head tube. This helps assure that the frame’s lifetime warranty against manufacturers defects will never be needed.

Components:
xcept for the dropout and spindle problems, this bike is really good as far as components go. It’s nicely set up¿especially the wheelset.” Every bearing on this bike is sealed. The wheels are made up of sealed XS Six Shooter II hubs, black spokes, and Mavic XY rims. Top notch stuff. The XS hubs are high-flanged, which makes them slightly heavier, but also noticeably stronger. A tall flange means that you can use shorter spokes, which in turn makes for a wheel that is less likely to bend. The black Mavic rims have machined sidewalls, and spoke positioning that puts the spokes closer to the edge of the rim for increased strength. Wrapped around the Mavic rims are XS Scrambler tires with a 2.125 up front and a 1.75 in the rear. They held their own in the loose dirt and hooked-up on the hardpack. Other XS parts include the 2-1/2″-reach (XL length) machined, threadless stem, which had no trouble holding the 27-1/4″ wide chromoly XS bars. A machined single-bolt seat clamp held the alloy XS micro-adjust seat post in place with no movement¿even after a few hard seat landings. The three-piece XS Drive Shaft 3 cranks are 180mm in length and are made of strong chromoly. A pinch bolt keeps everything locked down. Aside from the bent spindle, they stayed tight and spun smooth the entire time. In regards to the XS 44-tooth CNC machined sprocket, Scott said, “The chainring is a little heavy because it’s a solid disk.” While this is true, a solid chainring should provide some extra beef to keep it true over time. Even after Scott 50-50’d a landing, it stayed perfectly straight. If you like your bike to be light, you might want to change it, though. XS also provides the platform pedals, which treated us right at the trails, and will work great for racing. Plenty of grip is provided by the replaceable thread-in pins.

Good grip was also provided by Schwinn’s Stinger grips. Scott didn’t wear gloves, but his hands comfortably stuck to the grips in the 90-degree weather anyway. Plastic end-caps will let you go down repeatedly without chopping the end out of your grips. The Schwinn Stinger seat provided comfortable seating, and has been crash-proofed with Kevlar sides and a wrap-around plastic piece that covers the lower back edge of both sides. Good thinking on Schwinn’s part. The rails slightly bent¿not unusual considering some of the landings the seat went through (including an impromptu ghost-ride-to-cartwheel when the bike was ditched in favor of rider safety in the rhythm section).

ACS provides the 16-tooth freewheel which held up fine. KMC makes the 1/8″ chain, which we would suggest replacing with a 3/32″ Sedis. The KMC didn’t break, but we like the feel of a top-quality chain. Tektro V-brakes and lever provide all the stopping power you need, along with good side-to-side adjustability on both brake arms. FSA builds the sealed bearing headset which didn’t give us any problems whatsoever. Matt’s Pro Stock 1 also comes with Schwinn’s own chain tensioners which received mixed opinions in the looks department. They are a little bulky, but worked well. Component-wise this bike is almost perfect, and the only thing we would like to see added is a padset.

Appearance:
“The whole bike looks really good. The gold, black, and red is a pretty good color combination” We agree, this bike looks rad. It’s getting harder for companies to do something different with their bikes color-wise. A few years ago 90% of bikes were chrome, now everyone is trying to be original with colors, and Schwinn has done a good job.

Is it for You?
“I’d recommend it to just about anyone who will fit on it¿it’s for a bigger rider. It’s a good starter bike, all the way up to a good pro’s bike.” If Matt Pohlkamp can win AA Pro mains on this bike, it should take you to some podium finishes too. At $599, this bike isn’t cheap. With the stock component selection, however, you get a lot for your money. Considering that the two problems (not counting the fork) we encountered have been fixed, the question may not be whether you have $599 to spend on the bike, but if you’ve got the money to add a trophy room to your house.

1999 Schwinn Pro Stock 1
Matt Pohlkamp Signature Model
Price, Specs & Info:

Complete Bike Price: $599
Finishes Available: Mirror Gold
Complete Bike Weight: 24 lb.
Head Tube Length: 4″
Head Tube Angle: 73.5°
Seat Tube Angle: 71°
Seat Tube Inside Diameter: 26.8mm
Seat Tube Outside Diameter: 31.8mm
Steerer Tube Size: 1-1/8″
Handlebar Rise: 7-7/8″
Handlebar Width: 27-1/2″
Top Tube Length: 21-1/4″
Top Tube Outer Diameter: 1-1/2″
Down Tube Outer Diameter: 2″
Fork Leg Outer Diameter: 1-1/4″
Bottom Bracket Height: 11-1/2″
Chainstay Length: 15-1/2″ (to center of dropout)
Chainstay Outer Diameter: Tapers from 1-5/8″-3/4″
Wheelbase: 37-3/4″-39-1/4″

Components: Frame: 6061-T6 aluminum
Fork: 100% chromoly
Handlebars: XS chromoly
Stem: XS Six Shooter II
Grips: Schwinn Stinger
Headset: FSA Orbit, sealed bearing
Rims: Mavic XY
Hubs: XS Six Shooter II, sealed bearing
Tires: XS Scrambler
Brake: Tektro V-brakes
Brake Pads: Tektro
Brake Lever: Tektro
Pedals: XS Pro
Cranks: XS Drive Shaft 3 chromoly three-piece, 180mm
Bottom Bracket Set: XS, sealed bearing
Sprocket: XS CNC, 44-tooth
Freewheel: ACS Claws, 16-tooth
Chain: KMC
Seat: Schwinn Stinger w/Kevlar sides
Seat Post: XS alloy micro-adjust
Seat Post Clamp: XS Six Shooter II
Warranty (frame): Lifetime for manufactures defects
Warranty (fork): Lifetime for manufactures defects
For More Info Contact: Schwinn
1690 38th St.
Boulder, CO 80301
Phone: (800) SCHWINN
www.SCHWINN.com
Considering that the two problems (not counting the fork) we encountered have been fixed, the question may not be whether you have $599 to spend on the bike, but if you’ve got the money to add a trophy room to your house.

1999 Schwinn Pro Stock 1
Matt Pohlkamp Signature Model
Price, Specs & Info:

Complete Bike Price: $599
Finishes Available: Mirror Gold
Complete Bike Weight: 24 lb.
Head Tube Length: 4″
Head Tube Angle: 73.5°
Seat Tube Angle: 71°
Seat Tube Inside Diameter: 26.8mm
Seat Tube Outside Diameter: 31.8mm
Steerer Tube Size: 1-1/8″
Handlebar Rise: 7-7/8″
Handlebar Width: 27-1/2″
Top Tube Length: 21-1/4″
Top Tube Outer Diameter: 1-1/2″
Down Tube Outer Diameter: 2″
Fork Leg Outer Diameter: 1-1/4″
Bottom Bracket Height: 11-1/2″
Chainstay Length: 15-1/2″ (to center of dropout)
Chainstay Outer Diameter: Tapers from 1-5/8″-3/4″
Wheelbase: 37-3/4″-39-1/4″

Components: Frame: 6061-T6 aluminum
Fork: 100% chromoly
Handlebars: XS chromoly
Stem: XS Six Shooter II
Grips: Schwinn Stinger
Headset: FSA Orbit, sealed bearing
Rims: Mavic XY
Hubs: XS Six Shooter II, sealed bearing
Tires: XS Scrambler
Brake: Tektro V-brakes
Brake Pads: Tektro
Brake Lever: Tektro
Pedals: XS Pro
Cranks: XS Drive Shaft 3 chromoly three-piece, 180mm
Bottom Bracket Set: XS, sealed bearing
Sprocket: XS CNC, 44-tooth
Freewheel: ACS Claws, 16-tooth
Chain: KMC
Seat: Schwinn Stinger w/Kevlar sides
Seat Post: XS alloy micro-adjust
Seat Post Clamp: XS Six Shooter II
Warranty (frame): Lifetime for manufactures defects
Warranty (fork): Lifetime for manufactures defects
For More Info Contact: Schwinn
1690 38th St.
Boulder, CO 80301
Phone: (800) SCHWINN
www.SCHWINN.com