This is our most in-depth bike check we have ever posted on the site. “Mr. Particular” himself took time (obviously a lot of time) to tell us all about what may be one of the most custom bikes on the face of the planet. Chase has been riding flatland and progressing the sport for two decades and knows exactly what he likes—and will settle for nothing less. Without further ado, here is Chase’s intensely custom bike as only he could explain it.

Name: Chase Gouin
Age: 36
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
Sponsors: Odyssey, ODI
Frame: Custom frame made by Quamen. 75 degree head tube. 69 degree seat tube. 19.125 inch top tube. Measurement from center of bottom bracket to front of dropout slot is 14 inches. I run my axle at 14.5 inches. Literally no other frame identical to this. As always, I have a platform on my frames Fork: Custom Odyssey fork made only for me. Narrower legs, also tapered, cut and capped on the inside, leaving maximum shoe pivot space to the outside. 30mm dropout offset. Special lower steerer tube extension to reduce gap above tire. Sides of extension are curved to create more flowing front cable routing directly to the side which hugs fork leg better and does not get kicked by shoes.
Stem: 45mm reach Fly Stem
Bars: Odyssey Chase Gouin signature bars (sample pair) The version I use are called “B.S Bars,” meaning that they DO have back sweep. Specs on this version are: 26′ wide, 8″ rise, 6 degrees upsweep and 6 degrees backsweep. The sample version I’m using now only have about 4.5 degree backsweep, but that was a mistake. The other version are called “No BS Bars,” meaning that they DO NOT have back sweep. The specs for this version are: 25″ wide, 7-5/8″ rise, 3 degree upsweep, zero backsweep. The zero backsweep version is currently in production in some places and will be everywhere soon. My 6/6 degree backsweep version will be in full production shortly after that.
Grips: ODI longneck. I cut and piece them together so that I have the same minimal flared end piece on both sides. This way, the side of the palm of my hand is cushioned near the bar end as well as having a little thumb press area near the lever.
Barends: 7075 aluminum wedge system
Headset: Quamen Lardset. It’s like an integrated headset, but the cups press on over the head tube and then regular integrated bearings go inside the cups.
Clamp: 88 products double clamp
Seatpost: Thomson Elite. I have a solid aluminum rod pressed into it to avoid crushing/pinching the seatpost at the clamp area.
Seat: Padded Velo style seat by We The People.
Cranks: RNC 7075 arms with titanium spindle.
Sprocket: Profile 20 tooth
Chain: KMC Z-Chain dull silver
Chain Tensioner: The custom Quamen frame I have comes with the G7 adapt-to-3/8″ chain tensioners, but they crack immediately due to un-necessary machining on the inside surface of the tensioner plate. So I ended up using Quamen “Pop” tensioners, but I had to file the part of it that fits into the dropout slot so it was the same width as the dropout.
Brakes: Front brake only. It’s an out of production Suelo front brake that is really low profile; closer to fork so my shoe doesn’t kick it so much.
Brake Lever: I have a double front brake set up, so I use a lever on the right and left side with one continuos cable. I use a cut knarp on the end of the cable in the right lever, which fits into the lever handle hole. They are Tech 77 levers with the ball ends of handles rounded slightly so the side of my middle finger doesn’t get mangled. I also countersink the hole that the clamp portion allen bolt goes into so that the allen head doesn’t stick out.
Tires: Odyssey Frequency G (Although I occasionally use the Original ACS R.L. Edge tires when I find them.)
Front wheel: G-sport Ribcage rim radial laced into a Fly hub
Rear Wheel: G-sport Ribcage rim radial laced into Nankai freecoaster with Profile shell.
Pedals: KHE Stimulatorz
Pegs: Custom, one of a kind pegs me for me by J.R. at Threshold Manufacturing in Pennsylvania. They are 6061 aluminum main body with pressed in steel end caps. Main body portion has grip tape, and then a thin strip of textured rubber tape near the ends for slicker but still controlled shoe pivoting.

Modifications/Other/Extras:
There are dozens of other little modifications that I can’t even get into. That black plate looking piece behind my seat tube is a special piece I made to raise that area up a bit for boost off the tire decades and so that my shoe doesn’t get sucked too far into that low frame area.

Which parts do you go through the most?
It’s hard to say. I’ve been in this phase for years where I’ve been struggling to keep just one dialed bike that is near ideal for me. But scrambling to get parts made and or altered to work better, it seems like no parts stay on my bike long enough to determine what lasts. My answer to this question is that I don’t really wear down parts so much as I have to change them for other random reasons usually referring to some inadequacy or faultiness. I suppose that tires and shoes go fairly quickly depending on the surface I’m riding on and or which style of tricks I’m working on. I firmly believe that if a rider takes the time to figure out which parts are tried, tested and true for them, with proper set up and maintenance that parts can last a long time in flatland. Right now, this bike is about the best suited for me as well as the most solid and trustworthy through and through.

Describe your bike setup and how you like your bike to feel…
My bike is generally set up closer to what it was back in the early to mid 90’s as far as size and basic geometry. I have, however, made some subtle changes with the times. If I see that I can use a modern part that will only help my riding, like with specific trick variations, then I will use it as long as it doesn’t change the general feel or angles of the bike. Compared to back in the day: my bars are back a bit and are 25-1/2″ wide as opposed to 27-28.” This bike I have now is around 27 pounds and is the lightest I’ve ever had. I’ll probably go just a couple pounds lighter and leave it at that. I’m older and my arms often hurt, so it’s good to have a lighter bike, but I still need some weight to throw around for momentum. Nothing on my bike can be loose, or make any noise that refers to a potential problem. If anything like this happens, I simply can’t and won’t ride. I will put my riding and life on hold until the issue is sorted and my bike is how it has to be. It seems excessive, but knowing that my bike is just right, I have the peace of mind and then I ride better. I actually DO ride better because if it.

Why do you run grip tape on your top tube and frame stand?
These are places I stand on to do tricks from time to time so I want confident footing when landing on or pushing off those areas.

Why is your stem padded?
I make my own custom stem pads. I have a big sheet of neoprene. I cut a rectangle type shape, stitch hard Velcro on top and have three thin soft Velcro strips that wrap around and fasten it (two front to back and one around the middle). It works great, is not bulky and doesn’t even interfere with the gyro. I do this for the added confidence to go for tricks and know that if I hit my knee there, it won’t hurt.

Describe the contents of your bags when you go to a session…
I’m very prepared when I go ride. I use an Odyssey Beta Bag, which works great for my setup. My tool kit goes in the hard inside compartment. All my sweat bands and arm braces go in the underside compartment. In the main middle compartment I put my flex fit hats, a sweat towel (that’s why Towelie says “Don’t forget to bring a towel.”), any extra clothing which may be needed depending on the weather, and one approx. 1.5 liters of water. In the flap-open inner compartment I have a first aid kit such as band-aids, Neosporin, and medical tape. In other various compartments I’ll have baby powder, sanitary baby wipes (I crap a lot), travel tissue packs, lip balm, hand sanitizer, hand lotion, and Motrin for the pain in my arms. The Odyssey Beta Bag has outer straps so I make use of these. I strap a cooler pack on with my lunch in it. I also strap on what is actually one of those long bags that hold folding camping chairs, which in my case contains my custom detachable broom and squeegee set up. I often have to get rid of puddles and or debris from riding spots. I might also strap my pump on there, but not usually because I drive to my riding spots when I can and I always check my air pressure before leaving the house.

At home when getting ready to ride, I select a pair of my riding pants, which are usually 98 percent cotton and 2 percent spandex, which have been tapered and shortened to the ideal length. (I don’t ride in boxers anymore.) I now ride only in sweat-wicking shirts, which transport moisture to the outer layer of the garment. My KHE shin pads go on under my pants. I use these neoprene ankle guards over my socks even though I wear mid-top Nike shoes because they protect in between the bottom of the shin guard and the top of the shoe and generally make the ankles feel more supported. I just found some sweat-wicking flex fit hats, so I’ll probably be using those from now on. I tested one in Costa Rica in the crazy heat and humidity and it really works.

It all seems far too elaborate, but it has become my normal daily ritual and it’s what I feel confident and comfortable with. I guess when you get older you start to need little extra things to help you out with what you have already been doing for years. But most of you would agree that once you realize that something or some way of doing something works better, and you experience those advantages, it is hard to go back to anything less than that. That is what it’s increasingly becoming for me in recent years; whether it be bike parts or any of this other stuff. Some people, even riders, think I’m nuts or that I don’t really need it, but to them I simply say… “I need what I need in order to do what I do.” I guess they don’t understand. I’ve never whent at anything in a mediocre way.

Final words…
Thanks again to Odyssey for all their support, as well as ODI for the great grips. Thanks to Thomson seatposts. Also thanks to Tree Bicycle Company for flowing me the sprockets and comfortable shirts. Also, very special thanks to KHE for everything they have flowed me. I have 3 bikes in total, so I use Hindenburg cranks on one of those, and will be testing the Reverse Hub, and Prismatic seatpost, and Bram chain tensioners very soon. I don’t always immediately use every part that people send me, but I do keep it all and wait until the right time to set up my ideal bike or bikes. If the bike or bikes that I am currently using are not having any problems, then generally I won’t change any parts on them. But I most certainly greatly appreciate all the high-quality backup parts that will inevitably be used. I’m just looking out for myself to ensure dialed bikes from here on out, due to so many past issues. You have all been and are a big help to my cause to keep riding. Also thanks to Fly for the super dependable stems, front hubs, and for the rear brakes and cranks. Also Thanks to Brian Scura at SST for the cables and the DC Amplifier piece which works incredibly powerful and well. Also, thanks to Dia Tech for the extra levers and the Flexi cable adjusters. Thanks to Zenta at Quamen. Thanks to Bo Wade for the custom Quamen frame and all the other favors. Let me not forget big thanks to Tena Campbell, Chris Taylor, Jay Sml (that’s why Towelie says “Don’t forget to bring a towel.”), any extra clothing which may be needed depending on the weather, and one approx. 1.5 liters of water. In the flap-open inner compartment I have a first aid kit such as band-aids, Neosporin, and medical tape. In other various compartments I’ll have baby powder, sanitary baby wipes (I crap a lot), travel tissue packs, lip balm, hand sanitizer, hand lotion, and Motrin for the pain in my arms. The Odyssey Beta Bag has outer straps so I make use of these. I strap a cooler pack on with my lunch in it. I also strap on what is actually one of those long bags that hold folding camping chairs, which in my case contains my custom detachable broom and squeegee set up. I often have to get rid of puddles and or debris from riding spots. I might also strap my pump on there, but not usually because I drive to my riding spots when I can and I always check my air pressure before leaving the house.

At home when getting ready to ride, I select a pair of my riding pants, which are usually 98 percent cotton and 2 percent spandex, which have been tapered and shortened to the ideal length. (I don’t ride in boxers anymore.) I now ride only in sweat-wicking shirts, which transport moisture to the outer layer of the garment. My KHE shin pads go on under my pants. I use these neoprene ankle guards over my socks even though I wear mid-top Nike shoes because they protect in between the bottom of the shin guard and the top of the shoe and generally make the ankles feel more supported. I just found some sweat-wicking flex fit hats, so I’ll probably be using those from now on. I tested one in Costa Rica in the crazy heat and humidity and it really works.

It all seems far too elaborate, but it has become my normal daily ritual and it’s what I feel confident and comfortable with. I guess when you get older you start to need little extra things to help you out with what you have already been doing for years. But most of you would agree that once you realize that something or some way of doing something works better, and you experience those advantages, it is hard to go back to anything less than that. That is what it’s increasingly becoming for me in recent years; whether it be bike parts or any of this other stuff. Some people, even riders, think I’m nuts or that I don’t really need it, but to them I simply say… “I need what I need in order to do what I do.” I guess they don’t understand. I’ve never whent at anything in a mediocre way.

Final words…
Thanks again to Odyssey for all their support, as well as ODI for the great grips. Thanks to Thomson seatposts. Also thanks to Tree Bicycle Company for flowing me the sprockets and comfortable shirts. Also, very special thanks to KHE for everything they have flowed me. I have 3 bikes in total, so I use Hindenburg cranks on one of those, and will be testing the Reverse Hub, and Prismatic seatpost, and Bram chain tensioners very soon. I don’t always immediately use every part that people send me, but I do keep it all and wait until the right time to set up my ideal bike or bikes. If the bike or bikes that I am currently using are not having any problems, then generally I won’t change any parts on them. But I most certainly greatly appreciate all the high-quality backup parts that will inevitably be used. I’m just looking out for myself to ensure dialed bikes from here on out, due to so many past issues. You have all been and are a big help to my cause to keep riding. Also thanks to Fly for the super dependable stems, front hubs, and for the rear brakes and cranks. Also Thanks to Brian Scura at SST for the cables and the DC Amplifier piece which works incredibly powerful and well. Also, thanks to Dia Tech for the extra levers and the Flexi cable adjusters. Thanks to Zenta at Quamen. Thanks to Bo Wade for the custom Quamen frame and all the other favors. Let me not forget big thanks to Tena Campbell, Chris Taylor, Jay Smith, Dan Pither, Scott Powell, Chris Cotsonas, Mike Meza, Pino, Manuel Prado, Willie/Kathy E. and anyone else who has put up with or helped me out. And finally, a warm welcome to Terry Adams to the Odyssey team.

…Oh, and Pat Schoolen for everything and the ocean talkin’.

Thanks to Fat Tony and Ride Magazine for this opportunity to gain exposure.

Sincerely,
Chase Gouin.



y Smith, Dan Pither, Scott Powell, Chris Cotsonas, Mike Meza, Pino, Manuel Prado, Willie/Kathy E. and anyone else who has put up with or helped me out. And finally, a warm welcome to Terry Adams to the Odyssey team.

…Oh, and Pat Schoolen for everything and the ocean talkin’.

Thanks to Fat Tony and Ride Magazine for this opportunity to gain exposure.

Sincerely,
Chase Gouin.