Jeff Peeters stands next to his work in progress. He used scrap metal to build the almost one ton bicycle. Photo: Guinness World Records

Jeff Peeters stands next to his work in progress. He used scrap metal to build the almost one ton bicycle. Photo: Courtesy of Guinness World Records

There are few sports as weight conscious as cycling. Heavyweight male riders – 220 pounds or more – are known as Clydesdales. Heavyweight female riders – 160 pounds or more – are known as Athenas. And professional road bikes have to weigh 15 pounds or more to comply with Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) regulations. But Jeff Peeters from Belgium just nabbed a category for one: the heaviest bike in the world.

The short ride was scary. “It was a great experience. It’s high (two meters high), and it’s not very stable,” said Peeters during a phone interview.

Tipping the scales at 1895 pounds (and 15.6 ounces), the bike took six months to build and was confirmed by Guinness World Records as the heaviest rideable bicycle in the world. To be categorized as a bicycle by Guinness, a two-wheeler has to be propelled solely by human powered for 100 meters (326 feet).

Jeff Peeters rode his creation for more than 100 yards, straight into the record books.  Photo: Guinness World Records

Jeff Peeters rode his creation for more than 100 yards, straight into the record books. Photo: Courtesy of Guinness World Records

Peeters pedaled his creation down a street in Mechelen, Belgium – much to the amazement of the people passing by. Thanks to tractor wheels, Peeters creation may also qualify for tall bike status. And like a Ford Mustang, Peeters’ vehicle performs best when traveling in a straight line. The bike measures 7.4 feet tall and 16.5 feet long.

All in all, the creation took about six months to build and about 50 hours. The frame was built mostly from scrap metal and the most of the rest of the components came from old parts he had lying around the farm where he works. “I used some axle shafts from old machines. And there some new pipes, too. Some materials were new.”

Jeff Peeters fat bike is fatter than your fat bike. He used tractor tires for his rig. Photo: Guinness World Records

Jeff Peeters fat bike is fatter than your fat bike. He used tractor tires for his rig. Photo: Courtesy of Guinness World Records

The motivation was pure PR. “I wanted to build an eye catcher for making publicity for company: we deliver vegetables to homes,” he said in broken English.

The company’s name translates to Fresh and Healthy. And the company will continue to use the bike, which now was the company’s name painted on it, at local events.

Just how much publicity have they received?

“A lot,” he said. “More than a lot!”

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