Cones and flower pots secure bike lanes from careless drivers. Photo: GoFundMe

Cones and flower pots secure bike lanes from careless drivers. Photo: GoFundMe

The recent loss of Anita Kurmann, an endocrine surgeon and bike commuter, left Boston based cyclist Jonathan Fertig bewildered.

Tragedy struck when a truck swerved into Kurmann on Massachusetts Avenue while she was cycling in the bike lane.

Something as simple as a well placed orange cone can make all the difference on a busy street for a cyclist. Photo: GoFundMe

Something as simple as a well placed orange cone can make all the difference on a busy street for a cyclist. Photo: GoFundMe

The city had promised change by way of installing simple barriers along the lane, but was slow to act So, concerned citizen and fellow bike commuter Fertig took it upon himself to enact change.

“The city — and the advocates that helped crunch the data — have known for two years that the intersection has one of the highest crash rates for cyclists and pedestrians in the whole city, yet they had done nothing,” Fertig told Fast Company.

Picking up a copy of Tactical Urbanism, a book that tackles urban interventions (like DIY bike lanes) Fertig decided to drop cones and flower pots into the buffer of the lane, hoping to deter cars from entering the lane.

The response was immediate.

“It’s a joy for 200 feet, until you reach the corner where the terror resumes,” Fertig shared. “I’ve had countless people tell me online that the intervention made a big difference.”

To help further the cause, Fertig is raising money via GoFundMe to add more flower post down Massachusetts Avenue and beyond.

More from GrindTV

Toro Y Moi pays homage to Yosemite's Half Dome with new video

The Frontier Plus is the cat's meow of camping stoves

REEL ROCK film tour announces landmark 10th-year lineup