Thursday, REEF and the Surfrider Foundation announced that they will collectively contribute to the removal of up to 300,000 pounds of plastic pollution and trash through the efforts of an anticipated 90,000 volunteers at about 2,450 beach cleanups across the U.S. and Europe in 2019.

This has got to end. Photo: Courtesy of Dustan Woodhouse/Unsplash

These moves are being taken under the Surfrider Foundation’s Better Beach Alliance which was launched in 2018. Over the course of last year, the program acquired 33,092 volunteers across the U.S. and removed about 227,580 pounds of pollution and trash through 910 beach cleanups nationwide.

“Expanding the Better Beach Alliance to Europe is a huge step forward in our collective goal of protecting our oceans and beaches around the world,” REEF’s VP of Marketing Mike Matey said in a press release.

This year, the Better Beach Alliance is growing internationally with the addition of Surfrider Foundation’s European affiliate program where an anticipated 60,000 volunteers will work to remove up to 100,000 pounds of trash and plastic through 1,600 beach cleanups across Europe.

This move is in addition to the planned 200,000 pounds of pollution to be removed by 30,000 volunteers through 850 beach cleanups in the U.S.

“Clean water and healthy beaches are critical for our coastal economies, communities, and ocean and coastal recreation,” added Surfrider CEO, Dr. Chad Nelsen. “By supporting the reduction of plastic pollution from beaches across the U.S. and Europe, REEF is taking action to defend our ocean and coasts for this and future generations.”

Surfrider and REEF are on the right path. Photo: Courtesy of Surfrider Foundation

The collaborative Better Beach Alliance program invites brands to play a role in the preservation of clean and healthy places for all to enjoy.

For more information on the Better Beach Alliance, visit REEF’s website. To get involved, find your nearest Surfrider chapter or support Surfrider’s volunteer coastal defenders.

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