Angel Collinson lives an authentic life. The 28-year-old pro skier, who grew up at Snowbird Ski Resort (her father was a patroller), has always entertained herself and found joy and humor in her everyday life.

But being one of the best skiers alive has its stresses. With her grueling travel schedule and demands to continue to perform at the highest level, Collinson has found new ways of managing her stress (which are things that can benefit just about anyone). Here are some tips from Angel on how to simply live (and feel) better.

Put the Phone Down (Or at Least Look at It Less)

Photo: Courtesy of Nic Alegre/Red Bull Content Pool

“If you live a life on the road, it is hard to have automated habits,” Collinson tells ASN. “The struggle of travel is that it really challenges those routines. Making sure you are nourishing your body and your mind.”

Recently, Collinson started watching herself and her patterns. She noticed how attached she had become to her phone and how much time it was taking to constantly check it (e.g. social media and news). She experimented with changing these behaviors and replacing them with more conscious, thoughtful ones.

“The first habit that I started with is not sleeping with my phone, and having a regular alarm clock.” Says Collinson.

She turns off her phone completely at night and doesn’t check it until after she has checked in with herself. That check can be super basic and quick, whether it is 10 minutes of yoga or just as simple as drinking a quart of hot water with lemon.

“It makes me feel awesome,” she says. “It is so interesting how attached we have become to our phones and the excuses we make – like, ‘Oh well, I don’t know if this alarm clock is going to work,’ etc. We woke up to regular alarm clocks forever before we had phones.

“I have been trying to turn my phone off completely one day a week,” she continues. “I now notice how much more I enjoy life if I am more tuned into my body and not thinking about technology or what is going to happen in the future or how many ‘likes’ I got.”

Switch Up Your Food and Supplements

Angel has been using Hanah ONE for awhile, but she finds it important to switch things up. Photo: Courtesy of Hanah ONE

Collinson, who is learning and adapting Ayurveda practices to her lifestyle, subscribes to the rule that we shouldn’t take the same food and supplements for more than three months at a time.

“Coffee is a good example of this,” Collinson tells ASN.

As an on-and-off-again coffee drinker, Collinson tries to listen to her body more, and what it needs.

“Your food is the building blocks of what makes up your whole body,” Collinson explains. “Your intake really affects your thoughts and how you feel in subtle ways. I try to be mindful about what I am consuming every day what can I change. With that being said, I love Hanah ONE as an all-around supplement nutrient-dense boost, to help when you are traveling. And I don’t take it every day, but more when I am feeling more stressed."

Another way that Collinson lives Ayurvedically is by eating seasonally.

“The whole premise is that the body really wants to heal itself. At night the body is regenerating,” she says. “It is just insane how intelligent the body is and the way we live nowadays throws it out of whack. Our bodies really aren’t adjusted to living the way we are now. So, eating seasonally really helps your body to get back into a natural balance.”

Eat Early (or a Light Supper)

Angel picks her meals based on on the season and the time. Photo: Courtesy of Angel Collinson

Collinson is constantly on the road, often with film crews and several other people. There are endless group dinners and often they are later in the evening and seem to last all night. Collinson started to see a correlation between eating late and feeling moodier and having low energy the next day, from what she calls a “food hangover” or “gut bomb” (even when she has eaten a super healthy dinner).

“One thing that I have noticed this year is to eat an earlier or lighter dinner,” Collison tells ASN. “If you are going to eat late, try and eat something light, and if it is in the winter, soups are better than salads. You have a bit more digestive fire to break down raw vegetables, so in the winter it is better to have soups, bone broths if you want something more hearty.”

Lastly, Be Easy on Yourself

Photo: Courtesy of Nic Alegre/Red Bull Content Pool

“I always try and eat healthy on the road, but sometimes it is really stressful and I also believe that the more we stress out about not eating good food, it’s almost worse,” she says. “I am trying to go easier on myself to lower my all around stress.”

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