One of the great aspects of road biking is how much you can see while out on the asphalt.

Without too much effort, you can easily pedal 10, 20 or 30 miles on your bike in a single session and witness a variety of landscapes and settings that help keep each workout fresh and new.

“I love cycling. You’re outdoors; you can experience the world,” professional triathlete Jenny Fletcher told GrindTV.

“You’re going up this crazy climb, and all of a sudden you get to look down and you get to see where you just came from, and there’s just something liberating about it,” Fletcher continued.

But in order to be able to see all those marvelous sights, you need to be able to, well, see.

In order to keep you upright and moving on your bike, Oakley designed its Prizm Road lens to bring out the natural gradients of streets and highways. The lens helps illuminate any irregularities in your cycling path, which can help you avoid sketchy areas.

The Oakley Prizm Road lens helps the eyes make better sense of dark colors that often blend together and pose potential risk of skidding out or going OTB on your road bike. Photo: Courtesy of Oakley

The Oakley Prizm Road lens helps the eyes make better sense of dark colors that often blend together and pose potential risk of skidding out or going OTB on your road bike. Photo: Courtesy of Oakley

But unlike other sports, like trail running, where the settings you are performing in are awash with different colors, in road cycling, bikers are presented with one dominant color: black.

“The Road lens was … very challenging because you have, like, three colors: black and gray and kind of white,” Dave Steiner, research and development field-testing manager at Oakley, told GrindTV.

“The goal was to figure out a way to enhance and gain some contrast out of that.”

RELATED: Oakley's Prizm lens will up your mountain biking confidence

Oakley decided to do everything it could to make these darker colors pop when viewed through the Road lens, so that obstacles like tar and oil and potholes become more obvious while cycling.

The Road lens was one of the more challenging in the Prizm line to design. Photo: Courtesy of Oakley

The Road lens was one of the more challenging in the Prizm line to design. Photo: Courtesy of Oakley

“As a cyclist, you really need to make sure that you’re able to see those things, because you don’t want to go down on the road,” Steiner told GrindTV.

“With those Road lenses you’re able to see gravel, you’re able to see sand or dirt in a deep, dark corner of a road, which is huge.”

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